TfL consults on new second entrance at Southwark Tube station

Transport for London (TfL) is seeking views on plans for a second entrance at Southwark Tube station.

The station, which has won awards for its design was opened in 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension. It has approximately 17 million customers using it every year. From 2002 to 2017, daily entries and exits have doubled every five years and TfL predicts that the number of customers will increase significantly in the next 20 years.

The proposed entrance on Greet Street, at the corner of Wootton Street, will ensure the station is able to manage any future increases in passenger numbers and relieve pressure on the existing entrance. The upgrade will also provide more direct routes to The Cut and the Waterloo area, enabling customers to reach their destination quicker and will help support local businesses and restaurants. The land at the Greet Street location is owned by TfL, meaning that an entrance on this site would be cost effective.

The plans for the entrance include a planted roof and a community space. There are also plans to work with the local borough to improve the immediate area outside the entrance.

Marlon Osborne, Head of Customer Service for the Jubilee Line said: `A second entrance at Southwark station will make customer journeys easier for thousands of customers every day as well as supporting the growing number of homes and jobs in the area. I’d encourage all those living and working nearby to attend the exhibitions to learn more about the plans, share their views and help shape how the community space inside the station is used.’

TfL will be holding two exhibitions in the coming weeks for local residents, businesses and customers to discuss these plans with the Southwark station project team. Southwark station was designed by the late Sir Richard MacCormac. It includes a glass circular ticket hall and is known for its use of natural and artificial light to guide passengers through the station.

The continued modernisation of London Underground is a key part of the Mayor’s Transport Strategy to make London a greener, more accessible place. The investment in improving public transport will help reduce reliance on the car and contribute to the Mayor’s target of 80 per cent of journeys made by public transport, cycling or walking by 2041.

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